News

Check out this visualization of the CS department growth and achievements since 2000 (click to view interactive version):

Posted March 20, 2017 by Sophie Engle

Our open-access paper "Unboxing Cluster Heatmaps" is now published in BMC Bioinformatics, Volume 18 (Supplement 2):63 — Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological Data Visualization at VIS 2016!

Posted February 23, 2017 by Sophie Engle

We will hold weekly lab meetings in Spring 2017 every Thursday from 3:00pm to 4:00pm in LS 103.

Everyone (even those with little to no visualization background) are welcome to attend, but will be expected to participate. This includes participating in project discussions, presenting and discussing papers, and participating in visualization contests.

Posted December 13, 2016 by Sophie Engle

We will be offering the following courses during the Spring 2017 semester:

  • CS 360 Data Visualization
    Sophie Engle • MWF 2:15pm–3:20pm • LS 307

  • CS 486/686 Special Topics: Human Computer Interaction
    Beste Yuksel • TR 12:45pm–2:30pm • LS 307

As usual, you may also approach any of us to participate in a directed study if you are interested in visualization research.

Posted November 28, 2016 by Sophie Engle

The Department of Computer Science is now hiring for two Assistant Professor positions: a tenure-track position (heavier research load) and a full-time renewable position (heavier teaching load). All CS sub-disciplines will be considered!

The @USFCS department is a diverse and growing community with 10 full-time faculty members, over 200 undergraduate CS majors, and over 50 masters students. While we are growing, the CS department maintains small class sizes with 30 or fewer students, project-based learning, and a high degree of student-teacher interaction. Several faculty members are NSF funded and collaborate with institutions in Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area.

Posted October 20, 2016 by Sophie Engle

Our poster "Interactive Exploration of Multidimensional YouTube Data Using the GPLOM Technique" by Seimei Matsusaki, Xi Han, Alark Joshi, and Sophie Engle won the Best Poster Award at the 9th International Symposium on Visual Information Communication and Interaction (VINCI)!

Check out the poster, the abstract, or the live tool!

Posted September 26, 2016 by Sophie Engle

ACM will kick off their first talk of the ACM speaker series on September 15th at 11:45am in G12. Kan is an expert in the field of exploratory data analysis and the talk is aimed for all computer science students. Please mark your calendars. Pizza will be provided before the talk so come early!

Title

Introduction to Fast Exploratory Data Analysis Experience with R and Visualization

Abstract

R is arguably the best analytics platform in the world that is open-source with more than 9000 packages and is growing rapidly. But it's hard to start and be productive if you are not programmers. Exploratory (exploratory.io) is a desktop app that provides a simple and easy to use interactive data exploration environment where users can quickly access R's analytic power and visualization to explore various data ranging from files, databases, to NoSQL, and find valuable insights in a reproducible and collaborative way.

Presenter

Kan Nishida (@KanAugust), co-founder/CEO of Exploratory. Prior to Exploratory, Kan has 20 years of experience in building products and solutions in Big Data, Analytics, BI, and Data Visualization fields, at Oracle.

Posted September 07, 2016 by Sophie Engle

The Visualization and Graphics Lab is looking to hire one research assistant for the Fall 2016 semester. This is an on-campus job opportunity open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

Responsibilities

The duties for the research assistant will be as follows:

  • Assisting with the coding and analysis necessary on any of the active research projects in the lab. This includes work on visualization aesthetics and literacy, cluster heatmaps, and others.

  • Assisting with the design of user studies to evaluate the efficiency and accuracy of specific visualization tasks.

  • Assisting with one-on-one expert user studies.

  • Assisting with writeups of user study results in preparation for publication.

Students should expect to work a minimum of 10 hours per week. If the research is successful, students will be invited to be a co-author on related publications.

Qualifications

Current undergraduate (or graduate) students may apply for the position, but must already be proficient in object-oriented programming. Most undergraduate CS majors, CS minors, and computational Data Science majors that have passed both CS 212 and CS 245, or graduates that have passed CS 601 will qualify, but others can apply too.

Strong applicants will also have some familiarity with data visualization. This includes students that take visualization-focused sections of CS 384/694 Research Seminar, CS 398/498/698 Directed Reading and Research, and CS 386/686 Special Topics in CS. It also includes students that take CS 360 Data Visualization.

We are looking for students who know or are willing to learn JavaScript and D3 and who would ideally have created basic data visualizations (bar charts, scatterplots, etc.) before they begin the research assistant position.

Applicants should also be interested in continuing the research project beyond a single semester, either in a paid position or as a directed study opportunity. Applicants must be detail-oriented self-motivated independent workers with excellent written and oral communication skills.

Email your 1 page cover letter and 1 to 2 page resume by September 16th in PDF form to vgl@cs.usfca.edu with the subject "VGL Research Assistant Position" to be considered. In your cover letter, indicate you are applying for the research assistant position and highlight your qualifications.

We have multiple open positions. Please apply for only 1 position and indicate this position in your cover letter.

Posted September 06, 2016 by Sophie Engle

We have a unique paid part-time internship opportunity on collaborative visualization technologies. The internship will be located at an industry research lab in the SF Bay Area, and students will collaborate closely with both the Visualization and Graphics Lab and the industry research lab.

This position is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Students must already know JavaScript and want to work with both front-end and back-end technologies. Students will be held to a high standard and must be self-motivated independent workers with excellent written and oral communication skills. Experience with data visualization and D3.js is preferred. Students will be expected to sign a non-disclosure agreement before beginning the project.

Email your 1 page cover letter and 1 to 2 page resume by September 16th in PDF form to vgl@cs.usfca.edu with the subject "VGL Visualization Internship" to be considered. In your cover letter, indicate you are applying for the visualization internship and highlight your qualifications. This is a professional opportunity; your materials should have no grammatical errors and formatting inconsistencies.

We have multiple open positions. Please apply for only 1 position and indicate this position in your cover letter.

Posted September 06, 2016 by Sophie Engle

Welcome back students! Our Fall 2016 lab meetings will be every Wednesday 2:15pm – 3:15pm in Lo Schiavo Science Room G12 starting on August 31st. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Posted August 26, 2016 by Sophie Engle

Congratulations to Casey Haber and Lyndon Ong Yiu (both undergraduate CS majors) on their short paper publication "Do Defaults Matter? Evaluating the Effect of Defaults on User Preference for Multi-Class Scatterplots" and to Seimei Matsusaki and Xi Han (both MSCS graduates) on their poster on "Interactive Exploration of Multidimensional YouTube Data Using the GPLOM Technique" in the 9th International Symposium on Visual Information Communication and Interaction (VINCI)!

Posted August 12, 2016 by Sophie Engle

I am delighted to announce our paper "Unboxing Cluster Heatmaps" has been accepted to the 6th Symposium on Biological Data Visualization. This work was a fantastic collaboration between the Visualization and Graphics Lab at the University of San Francisco and the Pollard Group at the Gladstone Institutes and University of California San Francisco. Congratulations to everyone involved!

Posted August 11, 2016 by Sophie Engle

We posted the recording for Miriam Posner's talk "Data Trouble: Why Humanists Have Problems with Datavis, and Why Anyone Should Care" from our Data Visualization Speaker Series event on March 21, 2016.

https://youtu.be/sW0u1pNQNxc
Posted April 19, 2016 by Sophie Engle

We are thrilled to bring back the Data Visualization Speaker Series for Spring 2016! We have two fantastic speakers for this semester:

Feb 24, 2016

Alan McConchie
Visualizing the Past, Building Tools for the Future: Designing an Interactive Atlas of American History

Mar 21, 2016

Miriam Posner
Data Trouble: Why Humanists Have Problems with Datavis, and Why Anyone Should Care?

See each event page for more details, including how to RSVP!

Posted February 07, 2016 by Sophie Engle

Happy New Year!

We will hold our weekly lab meetings every Friday from 11:45am – 12:45pm in room LS 307 for Spring 2016. Our first meeting will be January 29, 2016.

All students interested in visualization are welcome to attend these meetings!

Posted January 04, 2016 by Sophie Engle

The Visualization and Graphics Lab is looking to hire one research assistant for the Spring 2016 semester.

Responsibilities

The duties for the research assistant will be as follows:

  • Implementing various static (non-animated) techniques for overplotting for scatterplot matrices using the P5 JavaScript library. This will involve researching related work and implementing several different techniques (opacity, hexbinning, density plots, and contour plots).
  • Assisting with the design of user studies to evaluate the efficiency and accuracy of specific visualization tasks.
  • Assisting with one-on-one expert user studies.
  • Assisting with writeups of user study results in preparation for publication.

Students should expect to work a minimum of 10 hours per week. If the research is successful, students will be invited to be a co-author on related publications.

Qualifications

Current undergraduate (or graduate) students may apply for the position, but must already be proficient in object-oriented programming. Most undergraduate CS majors, CS minors, and computational Data Science majors that have passed both CS 212 and CS 245, or graduates that have passed CS 601 will qualify, but others can apply too.

Strong applicants will also have some familiarity with data visualization. This includes students that take visualization-focused sections of CS 384/694 Research Seminar, CS 398/498/698 Directed Reading and Research, and CS 386/686 Special Topics in CS. It also includes students that take CS 360 Data Visualization. We are looking for students who are willing to learn Processing and p5 and who would ideally have created basic data visualizations (bar charts, scatterplots, etc.) in Processing/p5 before they begin the research assistant position.

Applicants should also be interested in continuing the research project beyond a single semester, either in a paid position or as a directed study opportunity. Applicants must be detail-oriented self-motivated independent workers with excellent written and oral communication skills.

Applications

Please send your resume by January 19th in PDF form to apjoshi@cs.usfca.edu to be considered for the position.

Posted December 15, 2015 by Sophie Engle

I am looking for a TA for CS 360 Data Visualization next semester. Details are below.

Qualifications

Experience with data visualization and/or Javascript is highly recommended, but not required. Excellent written and spoken English skill required. You must also be available to attend lectures MWF 2:15pm to 3:20pm.

Responsibilities

You will be expected to attend lecture and assist with any interactive exercises. Every week, you will be asked to (1) verify the functionality of weekly homework assignments, and (2) verify that students completed their pass/fail participation assignments. The grading will be based on functionality checklists and does not require visualization expertise, but it cannot be automated.

Application

To apply, please email sjengle@cs.usfca.edu describing your qualifications for the position by December 18, 2015. Please include your GPA for related CS courses.

Posted December 10, 2015 by Sophie Engle

We will be offering the following courses on visualization and/or graphics during the Spring 2016 semester:

  • CS 360 Data Visualization
    Sophie Engle • MWF 2:15pm–3:20pm • HR 235

  • CS 384/694 Research Seminar in CS
    Alark Joshi, Sophie Engle • M 1:00pm–2:05pm • LS 307

  • CS 686-01 Special Topics: Computer Graphics
    Alark Joshi • TR 12:45pm–2:30pm • LS G12

As usual, you may also approach any of us to participate in a directed study if you are interested in visualization research.

Posted December 02, 2015 by Sophie Engle

Welcome to our new lab website! We will use this website to highlight some of the latest data visualization and graphics research going on in the department, and to coordinate activities between the many faculty and students collaborating on projects.

Posted November 07, 2015 by Sophie Engle